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Published since 2005, the Yearbook of Peace Processes analyzes the most significant negotiation processes that have taken place during the year. Its author, Vicenç Fisas, is director of the School for a Culture of Peace.


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2016

This edition of the Yearbook on Peace Processes analyses conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phase, are faring well or, to the contrary, are stalled or in the midst of crisis. It also analyses some cases in which negotiations or explorations are partial; that is, they do not include all the armed groups present in the country . The majority of the negotiations refer to armed conflicts, but we also analyse quite a few contexts in which, despite the fact that there are no considerable armed clashes today, the parties have not reached a permanent agreement that would put an end to the hostilities and conflicts still pending. In that sense, the negotiations make sense in an effort to fend off the start or resurgence of new armed clashes.

Vicenç Fisas is the Director of the School for a Culture of Peace at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). He has a doctorate in Peace Studies from the University of Bradford, won the National Human Rights Aware in 1988, and is the author of over 30 books on conflicts, disarmament and research into peace. Some of his published titles include "Peace diplomaties: Negotiating in armed conflicts", "Handbook of Peace Processes", “Procesos de paz y negociación en conflictos armados” (Peace Processes and Negotiation in Armed Conflicts), and “Cultura de paz y gestión de conflictos” (Peace Culture and Conflict Management).

Yearbook on Peace Processes (pdf)

Yearbook on Peace Processes 2015

This tenth edition of the Yearbook on Peace Processes analyses conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phase, are faring well or, to the contrary, are stalled or in the midst of crisis. It also analyses some cases in which negotiations or explorations are partial; that is, they do not include all the armed groups present in the country (such as the case of India, for example). The majority of the negotiations refer to armed conflicts, but we also analyse quite a few contexts in which, despite the fact that there are no considerable armed clashes today, the parties have not reached a permanent agreement that would put an end to the hostilities and conflicts still pending. In that sense, the negotiations make sense in an effort to fend off the start or resurgence of new armed clashes.

Vicenç Fisas is the Director of the School for a Culture of Peace at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). He has a doctorate in Peace Studies from the University of Bradford, won the National Human Rights Aware in 1988, and is the author of over 30 books on conflicts, disarmament and research into peace. Some of his published titles include “Manual de procesos de paz” (Handbook of Peace Processes), “Procesos de paz y negociación en conflictos armados” (Peace Processes and Negotiation in Armed Conflicts), “La paz es posible” (Peace is Possible) and “Cultura de pazz y gestión de conflictos” (Peace Culture and Conflict Management).

Yearbook on Peace Processes 2015 (pdf)
ISBN: 978-84-9888-654-2


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2014

This ninth edition of the Yearbook on Peace Processes analyses conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phase, are faring well or, to the contrary, are stalled or in the midst of crisis. It also analyses some cases in which negotiations or explorations are partial; that is, they do not include all the armed groups present in the country (such as the case of India, for example). The majority of the negotiations refer to armed conflicts, but we also analyse quite a few contexts in which, despite the fact that there are no considerable armed clashes today, the parties have not reached a permanent agreement that would put an end to the hostilities and conflicts still pending. In that sense, the negotiations make sense in an effort to fend off the start or resurgence of new armed clashes.

Vicenç Fisas is the Director of the School for a Culture of Peace at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). He also holds the UNESCO Chair in Peace and Human Rights at the UAB. He has a doctorate in Peace Studies from the University of Bradford, won the National Human Rights Aware in 1988, and is the author of over 30 books on conflicts, disarmament and research into peace. Some of his published titles include “Manual de procesos de paz” (Handbook of Peace Processes), “Procesos de paz y negociación en conflictos armados” (Peace Processes and Negotiation in Armed Conflicts), “La paz es posible” (Peace is Possible) and “Cultura de pazz y gestión de conflictos” (Peace Culture and Conflict Management).

Yearbook on Peace Processes 2014 (pdf)


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2013



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This eighth edition of the Yearbook on Peace Processes analyses conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phase, are faring well or, to the contrary, are stalled or in the midst of crisis. It also analyses some cases in which negotiations or explorations are partial; that is, they do not include all the armed groups present in the country (such as the case of India, for example). The majority of the negotiations refer to armed conflicts, but we also analyse quite a few contexts in which, despite the fact that there are no considerable armed clashes today, the parties have not reached a permanent agreement that would put an end to the hostilities and conflicts still pending. In that sense, the negotiations make sense in an effort to fend off the start or resurgence of new armed clashes.

Vicenç Fisas is the Director of the School for a Culture of Peace at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). He also holds the UNESCO Chair in Peace and Human Rights at the UAB. He has a doctorate in Peace Studies from the University of Bradford, won the National Human Rights Aware in 1988, and is the author of over 30 books on conflicts, disarmament and research into peace. Some of his published titles include "Manual de procesos de paz" (Handbook of Peace Processes), "Procesos de paz y negociación en conflictos armados" (Peace Processes and Negotiation in Armed Conflicts), "La paz es posible" (Peace is Possible) and "Cultura de paz y gestión de conflictos" (Peace Culture and Conflict Management).

Yearbook on Peace Processes 2013 (pdf)
ISBN: 978-84-9888-511-8



Yearbook on Peace Processes 2012

"The Annual Yearbook on Peace Processes of the School for a Culture of Peace at the Autonomous University of Barcelona, is a unique resource in the field of peace and conflict studies. It is the most complete and fairly written description available, annually detailing every peace and mediation effort underway in the world. There is nothing else like it and as such it is an invaluable reference for experts, practitioners, students and anyone else interested in understanding current mediation efforts. The School for a Culture of Peace is well known for its years of work in this area, as well as the many seminars, graduate programs and itself advising in various mediation efforts. The School has educated 100s of students from dozen of countries over the last decade, many of whom are today working to end conflicts in various parts of the world. With this newest Yearbook on Peace Processes, the School for a Culture of Peace has maintained the high standard of past years. This should be read by anyone seriously interested in peace and mediation efforts today."

James LeMoyne,
Senior Advisor for Mediation, HD Centre, Geneva


"For several years the Annual Yearbook on Peace Processes from the School for a Culture of Peace in Barcelona has been a reliable and comprehensive source. It covers all ongoing peace processes with remarkable depth and insight. This makes it highly useful for teaching on all levels from high school and up. It is also an inspiration for research and media coverage on peace processes. The Yearbook, in fact, makes clear the need for more study in order to bring a number of protracted peace processes to a speedy and constructive conclusion. It also points to the many conflicts that have not seen any negotiations at all at this time. That should also be an impetus for action."

Peter Wallensteen,
Dag Hammarskjöld Professor of Peace and Conflict Research,
Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden,
and Richard G. Starmann Sr. Research Professor of International Peace Studies,
University of Notre Dame, USA


"War-to-peace transition needs, after all, political will and creativity by the stakeholders. Each process is unique and learning by doing. However, those who engage for peace can benefit from experiences in other places. This book assesses a variety of peace activities on a global level, outlining progress, backlashes and nonlinear developments. It is timely and a real treasure for scholars, practitioners, politicians and journalists."

Martina Fischer,
Deputy Director Conflict Research, Berghof Foundation, Berlin


This seventh edition of the Yearbook of Peace Processes analyses conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phase, are faring well or, to the contrary, are stalled or in the midst of crisis. It also analyses some cases in which negotiations or explorations are partial; that is, they do not include all the armed groups present in the country (such as the case of India, for example). The majority of the negotiations refer to armed conflicts, but we also analyse quite a few contexts in which, despite the fact that there are no considerable armed clashes today, the parties have not reached a permanent agreement that would put an end to the hostilities and conflicts still pending. In that sense, the negotiations make sense in an effort to fend off the start or resurgence of new armed clashes.

The organisation of the analysis of each conflict follows a similar pattern in most cases: 1) a brief synopsis of the context of the conflict, with a small description of the armed groups and the main actors intervening in each conflict, 2) the background to the peace process, 3) the events that happened in 2011, 4) a table with the most significant events in the year as a summary, 5) a selection of websites where you can monitor the conflict and 6) a table illustrating the relationships among the primary and secondary actors in each conflict, highlighting the spaces of intermediation in each case.2 At the start of every country, there is a small box with basic statistics on it. The government armed forces are not included in the section of the box called "Armed actors".



Yearbook on Peace Processes 2012 (pdf)
ISBN: 978-84-9888-427-2


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2011

This sixth edition of the Yearbook of Peace Processes analyses conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phase, are faring well or, to the contrary, are stalled or in the midst of crisis. It also analyses some cases in which negotiations or explorations are partial; that is, they do not include all the armed groups present in the country (such as the case of India, for example). The majority of the negotiations refer to armed conflicts, but we also analyse quite a few contexts in which, despite the fact that there are no considerable armed clashes today, the parties have not reached a permanent agreement that would put an end to the hostilities and conflicts still pending. In that sense, the negotiations make sense in an effort to fend off the start or resurgence of new armed clashes.

The organisation of the analysis of each conflict follows a similar pattern in most cases: 1) a brief synopsis of the context of the conflict, with a small description of the armed groups and the main actors intervening in each conflict, 2) the background to the peace process, 3) the events that happened in 2010, 4) a table with the most significant events in the year as a summary, 5) a selection of websites where you can monitor the conflict and 6) a table illustrating the relationships among the primary and secondary actors in each conflict, highlighting the spaces of intermediation in each case. At the start of every country, there is a small box with basic statistics on it. The government armed forces are not included in the section of the box called "Armed actors".

Yearbook on Peace Processes 2011 (pdf)


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2010

This fifth edition of the Yearbook on Peace Processes the conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement are analysed, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phases, are bearing fruit or, to the contrary, are stalled or enmeshed in crisis. It also analyses certain cases in which the negotiations or explorations are partial, that is, they do not encompass all the armed groups present in the country (as is the case of Afghanistan and Iraq, for example). The majority of the negotiations are linked to armed conflicts, but other situations are also analysed in which despite the fact that there are currently no armed clashes taking place, the parties have yet to reach a permanent agreement to put an end to the hostilities and pending disputes. Thus, the negotiations are relevant for preventing the beginning or resurgence of new armed confrontations.

The way of organising the analysis of almost every case follows a standard pattern, namely: 1) a brief synopsis of the context of the conflict, with a short description of the armed groups and the main players participating in the conflict; 2) the lead-up to the peace process; 3) the events that took place throughout 2009; 4) a table displaying the most noteworthy events in the year in summarised form; 5) a list of websites where the conflict can be monitored. and 6) a table to see the relations between the primary and secondary actors in each conflict, signalling the intermediary spaces in each case2. In the introduction for each country a small table is included with basic data about that country. In the "armed actors" section of the table governmental armed forces are not included.

Yearbook on Peace Processes 2010 (pdf)


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2009

This fourth edition of the Yearbook on Peace Processes analyses the conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phases, are bearing fruit or, to the contrary, are stalled or enmeshed in crisis. It also analyses certain cases in which the negotiations or explorations are partial, that is, they do not encompass all the armed groups present in the country (as is the case of Afghanistan and Iraq, for example). The majority of the negotiations are linked to armed conflicts, but other situations are also analysed in which despite the fact that there are currently no armed clashes taking place, the parties have yet to reach a permanent agreement to put an end to the hostilities and disputes still pending. Thus, the negotiations are relevant for preventing the beginning or resurgence of new armed confrontations.

The way of organising the analysis of almost every case follows a standard pattern, namely: 1) a brief synopsis of the background of the conflict, with a short description of the armed groups and the main players participating in the conflict; 2) the lead-up to the peace process; 3) the events that took place throughout 2007; 4) a table displaying the most noteworthy events in the year in summarised form; and 5) a list of websites where the conflict can be monitored. At the start of each country there is a small insert with basic information on the conflict in question; in the section entitled "Armed Actors" in this insert, the governmental armed forces are not included.

Peace Process Yearbook 2009 (pdf)


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2008

This third edition of the Peace Process Yearbook analyses the conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phases, are bearing fruit or, to the contrary, are stalled or enmeshed in crisis. It also analyses certain cases in which the negotiations or explorations are partial, that is, they do not encompass all the armed groups present in the country (as is the case of Afghanistan and Iraq, for example). The majority of the negotiations are linked to armed conflicts, but other situations are also analysed in which despite the fact that there are currently no armed clashes taking place, the parties have yet to reach a permanent agreement to put an end to the hostilities and disputes still pending. Thus, the negotiations are relevant for preventing the beginning or resurgence of new armed confrontations.

The yearbook also examines certain processes that have theoretically come to a close through a peace agreement, but that in our opinion are worth monitoring for at least another year with the purpose of revealing whether or not implementation of the agreements takes place as planned and whether the armed conflict can truly be regarded as over (such as in the cases of the Congo, Indonesia [GAM], Northern Ireland, Nepal [CPN], East Sudan and South Sudan), as there is a plethora of examples of peace agreements that for different reasons, have lasted a short time and hostilities have resumed.

Peace Process Yearbook 2008 (pdf)


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2007

This second edition of the Peace Process Yearbook analyses the conflicts in which negotiations are being held to reach a peace agreement, regardless of whether these negotiations are formalised, are in the exploratory phases, are bearing fruit or, to the contrary, are stalled or enmeshed in crisis. The majority of the negotiations are linked to armed conflicts, but other situations are also analysed in which despite the fact that there are currently no armed clashes taking place, the parties have yet to reach a permanent agreement to put an end to the hostilities and disputes still pending. Thus, the negotiations are relevant for preventing the beginning or resurgence of new armed confrontations.

The yearbook also examines certain process that have theoretically come to a close through a peace agreement, but that in our opinion are worth monitoring for at least another year with the purpose of revealing whether or not implementation of the agreements takes place as planned and whether the armed conflict can truly be regarded as over (the cases of the Aceh in Indonesia or Northern Island, for example), as there is a plethora of examples of peace agreements that have lasted a short time.

Peace Process Yearbook 2007 (pdf)


Yearbook on Peace Processes 2006

This first edition of the Peace Process Yearbook analyses conflicts in which negotiations to reach a peace agreement are underway. Conflicts are included regardless of whether the negotiations are: formal; currently in an exploratory phase; proceeding satisfactorily; or at a standstill. Most of the negotiations relate to armed conflicts. However, some of the negotiations relate to situations in which there are no serious armed confrontations, but the parties involved have not reached a definitive agreement to end hostilities and their unresolved differences. In such situations, negotiations are required to avoid beginning or reinitiating armed confrontations.

Peace Process Yearbook 2006 (pdf)
 

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